Saving Lives... Transforming Communities... Renewing Hope
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Welcome
Guyanese children welcome visitors to their new school, Judy’s School of New Beginnings. The school, located in the Essequibo region of the country, was funded by the Roetheli family of Kansas City, Mo.

Who is CSCD?

Church, School, and Community Development (CSCD) provides opportunities for churches, schools, businesses and other groups to fund projects to help the poor. Our goals are to:

  • Assist in identifying projects to sponsor
  • Help with fundraising ideas
  • Provide educational materials to promote awareness

What can CSCD do for YOU?

  • Help you to help others
  • Create a feeling of goodwill and community within your church, school, or business
  • Increase your church, school, or business visibility and awareness
  • Take “ownership” of a particular project and strengthen the bond between members, students, or co-workers
 
Vacation Bible Program
Kids for Housing

CSCD In the News




Be a Superhero, Save Lives by Pulling An All-Nighter

Have you ever wanted to possess superhuman powers and strength so you could right injustices in the world? On Oct. 17, you can do just that as you join students to tackle poverty.



GM Cares to make a difference: Volunteers to build a Food For The Poor house on local school campus

On Sept. 28, on the campus of Saint Andrew’s School in Boca Raton, Fla., a dozen General Motors employees will volunteer with students from the school to build a replica of homes given to families in need in Jamaica by Food For The Poor.



Working hard for Haiti, Rachel Wheeler is honored as a ‘Huggable Hero’

Rachel Wheeler’s unselfish acts of kindness earned her a nomination earlier this year as a Huggable Hero by the Build-A-Bear Workshop.



Building hope and transforming lives in the mountains of Nicaragua

To help address the needs of the poorest of the poor in Nicaragua, donors and volunteers from Catholic parishes in the Philadelphia area have funded projects for five years and have taken annual mission trips through Food For The Poor.



St. Joseph's 5th graders raise $3,400 to build family a home

The 20 students started their fifth grade at St. Joseph's School with a goal in mind -- to raise enough money to build a house for children in need. The house would be built in either Haiti or Jamaica; they didn't care which. But they knew that whoever received it would be someone in desperate need, and they wanted to help.



Second School Added to Stephanie Crispinelli's Legacy; Community Prepares For Softball Tournament

Last year, the Stephanie Crispinelli Softball Fundraiser accumulated $20,000 for the Stephanie Cripinelli Humanitarian Fund  schools program in Jamaica. The event celebrates the life of the 19-year-old Somers resident who tragically died in the 2010 Haitian earthquake.



Church of the Nativity changes lives in Haiti

Through Operation Starfish, the Church of the Nativity in Burke, Va., has worked side by side with Food For The Poor to help transform the lives of hundreds of families who once lived in deplorable conditions in Haiti.



Canned food collected and donated by local Boy Scouts

Michael Raghunandan, 17, led 10 of his fellow Boy Scouts to collect more than 2,500 cans of beans, Spam, mackerel and other food items for the poor.



A tent city for a good cause

Since the Haiti earthquake left such an impact on the Lynn community, Students for the Poor felt it would be appropriate to educate the campus and raise awareness about what current living conditions are still like after time has passed.



Basketball team learns life lesson off the hardwood in Jamaica
The varsity boy’s basketball team at Pine Crest School is making a name for itself. With more than a dozen wins under their belt this season, the two-time state champions tipped off two games in January – not in the “Sunshine State,” but on an island in the sun.




Office staff takes on challenge to build homes in Haiti
A large piece of cardboard, with cartoon-like images of a curvy street and houses made of pastel fabric is not something you’ll see in a world-famous museum. But this work of art, affectionately referred to as "the neighborhood," is so much more. It represents compassion, creativity, and the desire to make a difference in the lives of people three time zones and 3,000 miles away.